Pricing and Innovation Go Hand in Hand

“The single most important decision in evaluating a business is pricing power. If you’ve got the power to raise prices without losing business to a competitor, you’ve got a very good business. And if you have to have a prayer session before raising the price by 10%, then you’ve got a terrible business.” – Warren Buffet

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Greg VanderPol
Product Design and Gender Bias

Recent research from a group of Stanford scholars—Shelley Correll, Sarah Soule, and Elise Tak—showed that gender stereotypes had a significant impact on product evaluation. That is, traditionally male-oriented products such as beer, tools and automobiles can be viewed quite negatively if they are perceived to have a female progenitor

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Greg VanderPol
Beware of Consulting Fads in Times of Crisis

It’s a familiar story: an economic crisis hits, and as panic sets in, a charismatic leader descends from the mountain with a simple, magical, means of overcoming the crisis. While some dissent, many decide to put their faith in this new awe-inspiring leader.  The plan ultimately fails, leaving a newly enriched leader and an even more impoverished group of followers.

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Greg VanderPol
Unleashing America’s Innovation Potential

America loves innovation – and generally has done pretty well at it. But to truly unleash the innovation potential of America, there are several important gaps that still need to be addressed.  In fact, there is an untapped reserve of inventiveness that could quadruple the rate of American innovation, essentially hiding in plain sight. 

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Greg VanderPol
You Have Enough Ideas – Find More Problems

When many corporate managers think about how to increase innovation efforts, the natural inclination is to start with ideas. “We need more ideas,” is a common refrain. Most companies do not have a shortage of ideas. The problem often lies in recognition or execution.

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Greg VanderPol
Alienated From Our Data

In the 19th century, Karl Marx lamented that, due to the structures of capitalism, workers had become alienated from the products of their labor. In today’s economy, workers — and everyone else for that matter — are increasingly alienated from the products of their information.

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Greg VanderPol
Eight Insights from Two Days at Design School

How students think, and the type of student that design programs create is something that designers today should have a stake in.  In addition to being our colleagues of tomorrow, today’s students will be inheriting a world in need of creative, thoughtful, and responsible designers.

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Greg VanderPol